Two East Hampton political leaders face multiple felony counts

Four Are Charged With Election Fraud

Amos Goodman, Gregory Dickerson, Patricia Mansir, and William Mann

Updated

Two East Hampton residents, one a fixture in local politics, the other the former chairman of the town’s Republican Committee, are both facing multiple felony charges involving the alleged forging of signatures on petitions during this year’s primary season in East Hampton.

Patricia Mansir, 72, who has been active in East Hampton Town politics for decades, was arraigned Monday, December 4, on eight felony charges, including four counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree, and four counts of offering a false instrument for filing. According to District Attorney Tim Sini’s office, Mansir fraudulently presented petitions for a spot on the Independence Party’s primary election for the East Hampton Town Board on behalf of David Gruber.

Amos Goodman, 35, who resigned last week as the East Hampton Town Republican Committee chairman, is facing the same charges as Mansir, but more of them. In Goodman’s case, he is facing 10 counts of each charge Mansir is facing. According to a press release sent out December 4 by the district attorney’s office, Goodman “submitted nominating petitions that contained at least 43 forgeries.”

The release goes on to say that the forged signatures were “for Green Party judicial candidates, an Independence Party candidate for East Hampton Town Council and a Republican Party candidate for East Hampton Town Council.” It is not clear from the release which judicial race Goodman allegedly submitted phony signatures for.

Both Mansir and Goodman were said to have used one name each of a deceased person.

Mansir’s attorney, Carl Irace, denied the allegations Thursday. “She was out collecting signatures,” he said. “She had no knowledge.” Irace said fraudulent signatures can often be traced to a person signing a petition who either wants to help — or harm — a particular candidate.

The DA’s release said that the candidates involved were not aware of the actions of either Mansir or Goodman.

Mansir, a one-time Republican town board member, later served on the board as a Democrat. She has also served as a town trustee and previously served as a member of the town planning board for many years. Most recently, she has been involved with the local Independence Party committee.

Before becoming head of East Hampton Republicans, Goodman ran unsuccessfully on the party’s ticket in 2015 against Democrat Bridget Fleming for the Suffolk County Legislature.

On October 18 of this year, Goodman pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of aggravated unlicensed driving in East Hampton Town Justice Court, and was fined $500.

In addition to Goodman and Mansir, District Attorney Sini also charged two other Suffolk County residents, both employees of the Suffolk County Board of Elections, with similar crimes. William Mann, 60, of Cutchogue was charged with two felonies, criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree, and offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree, as well as two counts of official misconduct, which is a misdemeanor. Gregory Dickerson, 55, of Mattituck is facing four felony charges, two counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument, and two counts of offering a false instrument for filing.

Mansir, Mason, and Dickerson were all arraigned December 4 in Central Islip before Justice Jennifer Henry, and were released without bail. Goodman faced the same judge the next day, and was also released without having to post bail.

The last time the petition gathering process hit the headlines in East Hampton was in 2009, when a judge invalidated Bill Gardiner’s petition to wage a primary for nomination to one of the two Republican spots on the ballot for the town board. The judge’s action cost Gardiner a spot on the ballot and perhaps on the town board as well; Theresa Quigley and Dominic Stanzione, the Republican standard bearers that year, both won.

 


 

12/06/18

Mansir of Independence Party and Goodman, Republican, Arraigned

A political fixture in East Hampton Town politics, as well as a seemingly new, up-and-coming face, are both facing multiple felony charges involving the alleged forging of signatures on petitions during this year’s primary season in East Hampton.

Patricia Mansir, 72, who has been active in East Hampton Town politics and governance for decades, was arraigned Monday on eight felony charges, including four counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree, and four counts of offering a false instrument for filing. According to District Attorney Tim Sini’s office, Mansir fraudulently presented petitions for a spot on the Independence Party’s primary election for the East Hampton Town Board on behalf of David Gruber.

Amos Goodman, 35, who resigned last week as the East Hampton Town Republican Committee chairman, is facing the same charges as Mansir, but more of them. In Goodman’s case, he is facing 10 counts of each charge Mansir is facing. According to a press release sent out Tuesday by the district attorney’s office, Goodman “submitted nominating petitions that contained at least 43 forgeries.” The release goes on to say that the forged signatures were “for Green Party judicial candidates, an Independence Party candidate for East Hampton Town Council and a Republican Party candidate for East Hampton Town Council.” It is not clear from the release which judicial race Goodman allegedly submitted phony signatures for.

Both Mansir and Goodman were said to have used one name each from a deceased person.

Mansir’s attorney, Carl Irace, denied the allegations Thursday. “She was out collecting signatures,” he said, adding that often bad signatures are the result of a person person signing the petition who wants to help or hurt a certain candidate, and writes down a false name. “She had no knowledge,” Irace said.

The release said that the candidates involved were not aware of the actions of either Mansir or Goodman.

Mansir has previously served on the East Hampton Town Board, and is a former East Hampton Trustee, as well as a former member of the East Hampton Town planning board.

Before becoming head of East Hampton Republicans, Goodman ran unsuccessfully on the party’s ticket in 2015 against Democrat Bridget Fleming for the Suffolk County Legislature.

On October 18 of this year, Goodman pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of aggravated unlicensed driving in East Hampton Town Justice Court, and was fined $500.

In addition to Goodman and Mansir, District Attorney Sini also charged two other Suffolk County residents, both employees for the Suffolk County Board of Elections, with similar crimes. William Mann, 60, of Cutchogue was charged with two felonies, criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree, and offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree, as well as two counts of official misconduct, which is a misdemeanor. Gregory Dickerson, 55, of Mattituck is facing four felony charges, two counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument, and two counts of offering a false instrument for filing.

Mansir, Mason, and Dickerson were all arraigned December 4 in Central Islip before Justice Jennifer Henry, and were released without bail. Goodman faced the same judge the next day, and was also released without having to post bail.

The last time the petition gathering process hit the headlines in East Hampton was in 2009, when a judge invalidated Bill Gardiner’s petition to wage a primary for nomination to one of the two Republican spots on the ballot for the town board. The judge’s action cost Gardiner a spot on the ballot and perhaps on the town board as well; Theresa Quigley and Dominic Stanzione, the Republican standard bearers that year, both won.

t.e@indyeastend.com